Secondborn

 

They programmed you not to think for yourself. To follow orders. To do as you’re told. I bet you don’t even know why you can’t think for yourself. It’s the way you were raised, indoctrinated into ther society – and it is their society. It was never yours, not since the moment you took your first breath. It was always theirs.

 

Summary

Roselle St. Sismode is the second child of Clarity of Virtues, in a world where secondborn children are nothing more than a property of firstborns. On her 18th birthday she gets send away to become a soldier, but because many people feel a lot of animosty towards her and her family, her transition may not be very pleasant.

Writing

The writing style is very simple, but something about it seems very wrong. I can’t remember the last time when I struggled with a book as much as I did with Secondborn. I wasn’t able to imagine how anything looked. I couldn’t picture the scenery, the characters, the fight scenes. Nothing. Absolutely nothing.

Characters

The only character that is developed in any way is Roselle, but even that is lackluster. She is completely unlikeable and unrelatable. Nothing she ever does seems to have any sense. And her character arc is very… jagged? Her way of thinking doesn’t change over a long period of time. It takes nothing more than a blink of an eye and suddenly she is a completely different person.

Every other character was severely underdeveloped and was nothing more than a prop for Roselle.

Plot

The idea for this story is a material for an amazing book. But the execution was really bad. First of all there is no reason for why this system of firstborns and secondborns was implemented. It’s such an importrant part of this book that it needed a good and thorough explanation.

Everything in this book seems very convenient and feels like a lazy, uncreative writing.

Overall

It’s a bad, bad book. It reminds me of a cheap version of The Hunger Games. It’s still fairly entertaining, but ohhh so frustrating.

 

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